INFORMATIONS

TIMELINE

1975 Born Eldrick T. Woods on Dec. 30 in Southern California to Earl Woods, a retired U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel, and Kultida, a native of Thailand. Given the nickname "Tiger" after Earl's friend Vuong Dang Phong, a Vietnamese soldier with the same nickname.
1976
Six Months

Sees his father hitting golf balls into a net and begins to imitate his swing.

1978
Age 2

Appears on the Mike Douglas Show and putts against comedian Bob Hope.

Shoots a 48 over nine holes at the Navy Golf Club in Cypress, Calif.
1980
Age 4
Appears in Golf Digest magazine and on ABC's That's Incredible.
1983
Age 7
Appeared on "Today Show", "Good Morning America", ESPN, CBS, NBC, ABC. Wins the Optimist International Junior Championship. He would repeat this win at age 9, 12, 13, 14, and 15.
1991
Age 15
  • 1st place - Optimist International Junior World (5th time)
  • 1st place - Insurance Youth Golf Classic (Big "I") National
  • 2nd place - PGA National Junior Championship
  • Semifinalist at USGA Junior National Championship
  • Southern California Player of the Year
Becomes the youngest U.S. Junior Amateur Champion in golf history. Voted Southern California Amateur Player of the Year for the second consecutive year. Also voted Golf Digest Amateur Player of the Year.
1992
Age 16
  • 1st place - U.S. Junior National Championship (youngest ever to win)
  • 1st place - Optimist International Junior World (6th time)
  • 1st place - CIF-SCGA High School Invitational Championship (Individual)
  • 1st place - Southern California Junior Championship
  • 1st place - Ping/Phoenix Junior (AJGA)
  • 1st place - Edgewood Tahoe Junior Classic (AJGA)
  • 1st place - Los Angeles City Junior Championship
  • 1st place - Orange Bowl Junior International
  • AJGA Player of the Year
  • Golf Digest Player of the Year
  • Southern California Player of the Year
  • Titleist-GolfWeek National Amateur of the Year
  • 1st Team - Rolex Junior All-American
  • Participated in 1991 U.S. Amateur.
Successfully defends title at the U.S. Junior National Championships, becoming the first golfer to win the title more than once (he would win the following year as well). Competes in his first PGA Tour event, the Nissan Los Angeles Open.
1993 Age 17
  • 1st place - USGA Junior National Championship (only golfer to win twice)
  • 1st place - Ping Phoenix Junior (AJGA)
  • 1st place - Nabisco Mission Hills Desert Junior (AJGA)
  • 1st place - Pro Gear San Antonio Shoot-out (AJGA)
  • 1st place - Insurance Youth Golf Classic (Big "I") National
  • 2nd place - Optimist Junior International World
  • 5th place - Sunnehanna Amateur Tournament of Champions
  • Played in PGA Los Angeles Open and U.S. Open Sectional Qualifying
  • Top 32, 1992 US Amateur
  • AJGA Player of the Year
  • Golf Digest Player of the Year
  • Southern California Player of the Year
  • Titleist-GolfWeek National Amateur of the Year
  • GolfWorld Player of the Year
1994
Age 18
  • 1st place - USGA Junior National Championship (3rd time)
  • 1st place - Southern California Junior Best Ball Championship
  • 2nd place - AJGA Taylor Made Woodlands
  • Top 32, 1993 US Amateur
  • 1st Team - Rolex Junior All-American (4th consecutive year)
  • Played in the following PGA Tourney events: Los Angeles Open, Honda Classic, Byron Nelson Classic
  • Played in the US Open Sectional Qualifying
  • Southern California Player of the Year
  • GolfWorld Player of the Year
  • Winner, Dial Award - emblematic of top national high school male athlete for 1993
  • Accepted scholarship to play collegiate golf at Stanford University (entered Stanford in the fall of 1994)
Wins the U.S. Amateur Championship at the TPC at Sawgrass, becoming the youngest winner ever. Enrolls at Stanford University and wins first collegiate event, the William Tucker Invitational.
1995
Age 19
  • 1st place - US Amateur
  • 1st place - Western Amateur Championship (in Michigan)
  • 1st place - Southern California Golf Association Amateur Championship
  • 1st place - Pacific Northwest Amateur Championship
  • 1st place - CIF Southern Section Championship (individual)
  • Semifinalist - California State Amateur Championship
  • Tied 6th place - Porter Cup
  • Played in the Johnny Walker Asian Classic (Thailand)
  • Played in the following PGA Tour events: Nestle Invitational, Buick Classic, and Western Open in Chicago
  • L.A. Times Player of the Year
  • Orange County Player of the Year
  • Orange County League Most Valuable Player (4th time)
  • Entered Stanford University in Fall of 1994
  • 1st place - Wm. Tucker Invitational at Albuquerque (first collegiate event he ever entered)
  • Member or the US Team at the World Amateur Championships in Versailles, France - led his team to an 11-stroke team victory by shooting rounds of 71-75-67-72=285 (3-under par)
  • Named GolfWorld's "Man of the Year"
Defends title as U.S. Amateur champion. Voted Pac-10 Player of the Year, NCAA First Team All-American, and Stanford's Male Freshman of the Year (an award that encompasses all sports). Participates in the Masters, his first PGA major tournament, and ties for 41st as the only amateur to make the cut.
1996
Age 20
  • 1st place - US Amateur (3rd consecutive win)
  • Tiger Woods became a professional golfer August 28, 1996.
  • Finished tied for 60th in the 1996 GMO (made hole-in-one on the 14th hole on final round).
  • Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year.
  • PGA TOUR Rookie of the Year.
  • Won � Disney World/Oldsmobile Classic.
  • Won � Las Vegas Invitational.
  • Won � U.S. Amateur Championship, Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club, Cornelius, Oregon.
  • Won � NCAA Championship, The Honors Course, Chattanooga, Tennessee.
  • Won � John A. Burns Invitational.
  • Won � Cleveland Golf Championship.
  • Won � Tri-Match (Stanford, Arizona, Arizona State).
  • Won � Cougar Classic.
  • Won � PAC-10 Championship (shot course-record 61).
  • Won � NCAA West Regional.
  • Missed cut � Masters Tournament with scores of 75-75 (150).
  • Fred Haskins College Player of the Year.
  • Jack Nicklaus College Player of the Year.
  • PAC-10 Player of the Year.
  • First Team All-American.
  • Al Master Award co-winner (presented to the outstanding athlete at Stanford for attaining the highest standards of athletic performance, leadership and academic achievement).
  • Finished tied for 82nd in U.S. Open with score of 294.
  • Tied British Open 72-hole record for an amateur with total of 281 (75-66-70-70) at Royal Lytham & St. Annes, England, matching Iain Pyman at Royal St. George's in 1993.
  • Earned $940,420 worldwide in 11 tournaments as a professional.
  • Earned $790,594 on the PGA TOUR in eight events as a professional, finishing 25th on the money list. Earnings were the second-most for a rookie in PGA TOUR history behind David Duval ($881,436 in 26 events in 1995).
  • Became the first player to win twice in his first year on the PGA TOUR since Robert Gamez won the 1990 Northern Telecom Tucson Open and Nestle Invitational.
  • Became the first player to record five consecutive top-five finishes on the PGA TOUR since Curtis Strange in 1982.
  • Advanced to No. 33 on the world ranking, the fastest rise into the top 50 in history.
Becomes the first golfer in history to win three consecutive U.S. Amateur titles. Wins the NCAA individual men's championship with a 69-67-69-80-285. Ties the British Open record for an amateur with a 75-66-70-70-281. Turns pro in August and immediately signs endorsement deals worth $40 million from Nike and $20 million from Titleist. Wins the Las Vegas International and the Disney/Oldsmobile Classic�earning close to $800,000 in just eight events. Voted Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year.
1997
Age 21
  • The Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year.
  • Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America.
  • ESPY Male Athlete of the Year (Tied with Ken Griffey, Jr.).
  • Leading money winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $2,066,833 (most ever won in a single year).
  • Won $2,440,831 worldwide in 25 events.
  • Won � Masters Tournament (first professional major championship).
  • Won � Mercedes Championships.
  • Won � Asian Honda Classic (Thailand).
  • Won � GTE Byron Nelson Classic.
  • Won � Motorola Western Open.
  • Qualified for United States Team for Ryder Cup Matches.
  • Set Masters record for youngest champion (21 years, three months, 14 days) and became the first major champion of African or Asian heritage.
  • Set Masters 72-hole record with a total of 270 (70-66-65-69) and set Masters record with 12-stroke victory margin.
  • Shot 59, 13 under par in practice round on April 4 at home course, Isleworth Country Club, Windermere, Florida, with two eagles, nine birdies, and two pars on par-five holes.
  • Set record with five PGA TOUR victories in his first 16 events.
  • Achieved $2 million in PGA TOUR career earnings in a record 16 events (previous record was 50 events by Ernie Els in 1990-1996).
  • Achieved No. 1 world ranking in his 42nd week as a professional.
  • In first year as a professional, ending with NEC World Series of Golf, won $2,740,514 on the PGA TOUR ($2,946,163 worldwide) with six victories and 14 top-10 finishes in 25 events (seven victories and 19 top-10 finishes in 30 events worldwide).
Leading money winner on the PGA Tour with a record $2,066,833 in earnings. Wins first major championship, The Masters, by an amazing 12 strokes, the widest margin of victory the tournament has ever seen. Becomes youngest Masters winner ever, and the first of African or Asian descent. Wins three other PGA events. Achieves No. 1 world ranking in his 42nd week as a pro. Voted PGA Player of the Year and Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year.
1998
Age 22
  • Won $2,927,006 worldwide in 26 events to surpass 1997 earnings of $2,440,832.
  • Had 13 top-10 finishes in 20 starts on PGA TOUR.
  • Mark H. McCormack Award winner as the No. 1 player on the 1998 Official World Golf Ranking.
  • Won � Johnnie Walker Classic (Thailand).
  • Won � BellSouth Classic.
  • Won � PGA Grand Slam.
  • Qualified for United States Team for Presidents Cup.
  • Achieved eight-stroke comeback, winning Johnnie Walker Classic after starting fourth round tied for 18th place, then scoring 65 and beating Ernie Els with birdie on second playoff hole.
  • Reached final of Cisco World Match Play Championship before losing 1-up to Mark O' Meara despite being 12 under par for 36 holes (record score for losing finalist).
  • Won PGA Grand Slam, defeating Lee Janzen and Vijay Singh in match play.
  • Finished second in Nedbank Million Dollar Challenge after five-hole playoff with Nick Price.
  • In two years as a professional, ending with NEC World Series of Golf, won $4,561,494 on PGA TOUR ($5,300,204 worldwide) with seven victories and 26 top-10 finishes in 47 events (nine victories and 30 top-10 finishes in 55 events worldwide)
In an "off" year, wins just one official PGA event (BellSouth Classic) and finishes fourth on the PGA Tour money list with $1,841,117. Still makes 19 cuts out of 20 tournaments played, and closes the year with a No. 1 world ranking.
1999
Age 23
  • World Sportsman of the Year as chosen by the founding members of the World Sports Academy in voting for the Laureus Sports Awards.
  • The Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year for the second time in three years and the seventh man � and the second golfer � to earn the award twice since it was begun in 1931.
  • ESPY Male Athlete of the Year for the second time in three years and ESPY Golfer of the Decade.
  • Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR ( Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America.
  • Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.43) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America).
  • Leading money winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $6,616,585 (most ever won in a single year).
  • Won $7,681,625 worldwide in 25 events.
  • Had 16 top-10 finishes in 21 starts on PGA TOUR, and missed no 36-hole cuts.
  • Mark H. McCormack Award winner as the No. 1 player on the 1999 Official World Golf Ranking.
  • Achieved the highest points average (20.61) in the history of the Ranking.
  • Won � Buick Invitational.
  • Won � Deutsche Bank - SAP Open (Germany).
  • Won � Memorial Tournament.
  • Won � Motorola Western Open.
  • Won � PGA Championship.
  • Won � WGC NEC Invitational.
  • Won � National Car Rental Classic.
  • Won � Tour Championship.
  • Won � WGC American Express Championship.
  • Won � World Cup individual and team titles (with Mark O'Meara).
  • Won � PGA Grand Slam.
  • Qualified for United States Team for Ryder Cup Matches.
  • Won four consecutive PGA TOUR events, the first to do that since Ben Hogan in 1953.
  • In three years as a professional, ending with WGC NEC Invitational, won $8,965,129 on PGA TOUR ($10,895,083 worldwide) with 12 victories and 40 top-10 finishes in 67 events (16 victories and 45 top-10 finishes in 81 events worldwide).
  • Participated in the first network telecast of a golf event live in prime time, defeating David Duval, 2 and 1, in the Motorola Showdown at Sherwood, at Sherwood Country Club in Thousand Oaks, California, to win $1.1 million (including $200,000 to charity)
Earns the most money on the PGA Tour with a record $6,616,585 in winnings for the year. Records 16 top-10 finishes in 21 PGA Tour starts and makes the cut in all 21. Wins second PGA major title with a one-shot victory over Sergio Garcia in the PGA Championship. Records eight PGA victories overall, including the final four official tournaments of the year. Defeats David Duval at the Showdown at Sherwood, the first live network prime time golf telecast. Member of U.S. Team that recorded a tremendous final-day comeback to win the Ryder Cup. Voted PGA Player of the Year and AP Male Athlete of the Year for the second time in three years.
2000
Age 24
  • Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year, the first person to win the award more than once.
  • The Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year. He and Michael Jordan are the only athletes to win the award three times.
  • ESPY Male Athlete of the Year for the third time in four years.
  • Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America.
  • The Sporting News Most Powerful Person in Sports.
  • L�Equipe (France) World Champion of Champions.
  • Reuters Sportsman of the Year.
  • World Sportsman of the Year as chosen by the founding members of the World Sports Academy in voting for the Laureus Sports Awards.
  • Leading money winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $9,188,321 (most ever won in a single year).
  • Won $11,034,530 worldwide in 25 events.
  • Career money leader on PGA TOUR with $20,503,450 ($25,024,412 worldwide).
  • Had 17 top-10 finishes in 20 starts on PGA TOUR, and missed no cuts.
  • Mark H. McCormack Award winner as the #1 player on the 2000 Official World Golf Ranking. Achieved the highest points average (29.40) in the history of the Ranking.
  • Won � Mercedes Championships.
  • Won � AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am.
  • Won � Bay Hill Invitational.
  • Won � Memorial Tournament.
  • Won � U.S. Open Championship.
  • Won � British Open Championship.
  • Won � PGA Championship.
  • Won � WGC NEC Invitational.
  • Won � Bell Canadian Open.
  • Won � Johnnie Walker Classic.
  • Won � PGA Grand Slam.
  • Won � World Cup (with David Duval).
  • Qualified for United States Team for Presidents Cup.
  • Was the first to have as many as nine PGA TOUR victories in one year since Sam Snead won 11 in 1950.
  • Became the first to be under par in every event played on the PGA TOUR for an entire year.
  • Became PGA TOUR�s career leading money winner after AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am with over $12.8 million.
  • Became career victories leader (20) among active players on PGA TOUR by winning the U.S. Open.
  • Became the first ever to have won the U.S. Open, U.S. Amateur and U.S. Junior Amateur titles.
  • Tied U.S. Open record with 272 total (65-69-71-67), equaling the totals of Jack Nicklaus in 1980 and Lee Janzen in 1993.
  • Set U.S. Open record for margin of victory (15 strokes), surpassing the 11-stroke margin by Willie Smith in 1899. Also set major championship record, surpassing the 13-stroke margin by Old Tom Morris in 1862 British Open.
  • Set U.S. Open records for largest leads after 36 holes (6 strokes) and 54 holes (10 strokes). Also tied Henry Cotton in 1934 British Open for largest lead in a major championship after 54 holes.
  • Became the fifth player to lead U.S. Open from start to finish without being tied at end of any round.
  • With British Open victory, became the fifth ever and the youngest to complete the career Grand Slam of professional major championships, following Jack Nicklaus (age 26) Gary Player (29), Gene Sarazen (33) and Ben Hogan (40).
  • Became the sixth to win the U.S. Open and British Open in the same year, following Bobby Jones (1926, 1930), Gene Sarazen (1932), Ben Hogan (1953), Lee Trevino (1971) and Tom Watson (1982).
  • Set British Open and major championship records for the lowest score in relation to par, 19 under par, 269.
  • With PGA Championship victory, became the first since Ben Hogan in 1953 to win three major championships in the same year. Hogan won the Masters, U.S. Open and British Open.
  • Became the first since Denny Shute in 1936-37 to win the PGA Championship in consecutive years.
  • Became the first to win the U.S. Open, British Open and PGA Championship in the same year.
  • In four years as a professional, ending with WGC NEC Invitational, won $19,007,950 on PGA TOUR ($21,938,114 worldwide) with 23 victories and 56 top-10 finishes in 86 events (29 victories and 74 top-10 finishes in 105 events worldwide).
  • Became the second, along with Lee Trevino in 1971, to win the U.S. Open, British Open and Canadian Open in the same year.
  • Participated in the second network telecast of a golf event live in prime time, losing to Sergio Garcia,1 up, in the Lincoln Financial Group Battle at Bighorn, at Bighorn Golf Club in Palm Desert, California, to earn $400,000 (including $200,000 to charity)
Opens the year with wins at the Mercedes Championship and AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, his fifth and sixth consecutive PGA Tour victories (the longest streak since Ben Hogan in 1948). Wins U.S. Open at Pebble Beach by a record 15 strokes (65-69-71-67--272), the largest margin of victory ever recorded at a major tournament. Breaks or ties a total of nine records at the U.S. Open. Becomes the Tour's all-time career money leader.

Becomes the fifth player in history (and youngest ever) to complete the career Grand Slam by winning the British Open by eight strokes. His 19-under 269 is the best score ever at St. Andrews and the lowest score (in relation to par) at a major tournament.

Defeats Bob May in a three-hole playoff at Valhalla in Louisville to win his second consecutive PGA Championship and third consecutive major title. He joins Ben Hogan (1953) as the only two players to win three majors in one season.
2001
Age 25
  • ESPY Male Athlete of the Year for the third consecutive year, for the fourth time in five years, and winner of three ESPY Awards for a record total of 14 career ESPY Awards.
  • Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America.
  • First player to win Jack Nicklaus Award (presented since 1990) for three consecutive years and four years total.
  • Second player (other was Greg Norman 1993-95) to win Byron Nelson Award (presented since 1980) for three consecutive years.
  • Third player (others were Lee Trevino 1970-72 and Tom Watson 1977-79) to win Vardon Trophy (presented since 1937) for three consecutive years.
  • Leading money winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $5,687,777.
  • Fourth player (others were Ben Hogan 1940-42, Jack Nicklaus 1971-73 and Tom Watson 1977-80) to be leading money winner on PGA TOUR for three or more consecutive years.
  • Won $7,771,562 worldwide in 24 events.
  • Career money leader on PGA TOUR with $26,191,227 ($32,795,974 worldwide).
  • Had 9 top-10 finishes in 19 starts on PGA TOUR, and no missed cuts
  • Mark H. McCormack Award winner as the No. 1 player on the 2001 Official World Golf Ranking.
  • Won � Bay Hill Invitational.
  • Won � The Players Championship.
  • Won � Masters Tournament.
  • Won � Deutsche Bank � SAP Open.
  • Won � Memorial Tournament.
  • Won � WGC NEC Invitational.
  • Won � PGA Grand Slam.
  • Won � Williams World Challenge.
  • With Masters victory, became the first ever to hold all four professional major championships at the same time.
  • With Memorial victory, became the first to win the same event for three consecutive years since Tom Watson (1978-80 Byron Nelson Classic).
  • With WGC NEC Invitational victory, became the fourth to win two events for three or more consecutive years, joining Walter Hagen, Gene Sarazen and Arnold Palmer. Note: Some records keepers do not include Sarazen.
  • Set PGA TOUR record with 52 consecutive rounds of par or better (66 consecutive rounds worldwide).
  • Set PGA TOUR record with 35 consecutive events at par or better (stroke-play events only, all under par), from 1999 PGA Championship through 2001 Memorial Tournament.
  • Set record at Buick Classic with 97th consecutive week as No. 1 on the Official World Golf Ranking, surpassing Greg Norman, who had 96 consecutive weeks in 1995-1997. Finished 2001 with 124 consecutive weeks.
  • In five years as a professional, ending with WGC NEC Invitational, won $25,989,198 on PGA TOUR ($31,035,613 worldwide) with 29 victories and 69 top-10 finishes in 106 events (38 victories and 92 top-10 finishes in 130 events worldwide).
  • Participated in the third network telecast of a golf event live in prime time, teaming with Annika Sorenstam to defeat David Duval and Karrie Webb in playoff in Lincoln Financial Group Battle at Bighorn, at Bighorn Golf Club in Palm Desert, California, to earn $1.1 million (split with Sorenstam after $200,000 donated to charity).
In April, wins the Masters tournament, becomes the first golfer to be reigning champion of all four majors simultaneously. Wins five overall PGA events and takes home PGA Player of the Year honors for the third consecutive year.
2002
Age 26
  • Player of the Year as selected by PGA of America. Second player to win for four consecutive years (other was Tom Watson 1977-80).
  • Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.56) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America).
  • First player to win Byron Nelson Award and Vardon Trophy for four consecutive years.
  • First player to win PGA of America Player of the Year and Vardon Trophy in the same year for four consecutive years.
  • Leading money winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $6,912,625.
  • Second player to be leading money winner on PGA TOUR for four consecutive years (other was Tom Watson 1977-80).
  • Won $8,417,188 worldwide in 24 events.
  • Career money leader on PGA TOUR with $33,103,852.
  • Had 13 top-10 finishes in 18 starts on PGA TOUR, and missed no cuts.
  • Mark H. McCormack Award winner as the No. 1 player on the 2002 Official World Golf Ranking.
  • Won � Bay Hill Invitational.
  • Won � Masters Tournament.
  • Won � Deutsche Bank � SAP Open.
  • Won � U.S. Open Championship.
  • Won � Buick Open.
  • Won � WGC American Express Championship.
  • Won � PGA Grand Slam.
  • Qualified for United States Team for Ryder Cup Matches.
  • With Bay Hill victory, became the first to win three different events for three or more consecutive years.
  • Became the first ever to have won two or more titles each in the U.S. Open, U.S. Amateur, and U.S. Junior Amateur.
  • Became the first ever to lead the U.S. Open twice (also in 2000) from start to finish without being tied at the end of any round.
  • Became the sixth to win the Masters and U.S. Open in the same year, following Craig Wood (1941), Ben Hogan (1951 and 1953), Arnold Palmer (1960) and Jack Nicklaus (1972).
  • Participated in a network telecast of a golf event live in prime time, teaming with Jack Nicklaus to defeat Lee Trevino and Sergio Garcia, 2 and 1, in Lincoln Financial Group Battle at Big Horn, at Big Horn Golf Club in Palm Desert, California, to earn $1.2 million (split with Nicklaus after $200,000 donated to charity).
Wins second consecutive Masters, third overall, with a three-stroke victory over Retief Goosen. Becomes the youngest golfer in history to win seven PGA majors.

In June, he goes on to win his second U.S. Open at Bethpage Black.
2003
Age 27
Although he didn't win any of the major titles this year, Tiger still came in first in 5 of the 18 tournaments he entered, and ended the season winning over $6.6 million dollars.
2004
Age 28
Early in the year, Tiger became the first player to pass the $40 million mark in career earnings.

A tough year for Tiger, he loses his number one ranking to a hot Vijay Singh after Singh, Woods, and Adam Scott battle it out at the Deutsche Bank Championship over the Labor Day weekend. Tiger had been at the top since Aug. 1999�a record 264 weeks.
2005
Age 29
In January, Tiger wins the Buick Invitational, ending a slump that started in 2003. The last full-field PGA tournament he won was the Western Open in July 2003.

In April, Tiger defeats Chris DiMarco in a playoff to win the Masters for the fourth time. Tiger joins six-time winner Jack Nicklaus and other four-time winner Arnold Palmer as the only players to win four or more Masters.

With a commanding 5-stroke victory, Tiger takes the British Open trophy for the second time. This is his 10th major title and he joins Jack Nicklaus in being the only players to win all four major tournaments at least twice.
2006
Age 30
A good omen for Tiger�for the fourth time in his professional career he opens the season with a win. He wins the Buick Invitational at Torrey Pines in an exciting three-way playoff, defeating Nathan Green and Jose Maria Olazabal.

Earl Woods, 74, Tiger's father and the guiding force behind his career, dies of cancer in early May.
2007
In August, Tiger braves four straight days of triple-digit temperatures at Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to win his fourth PGA Championship and 13th major title. He shoots 8-under par for the tournament and wins by two strokes over Woody Austin and Ernie Els, who both make late charges but are no match for Tiger's tournament-long consistency. Woods is improves his record to 13-0 when leading a major championship going into the final day
2008
Age 32
In January, Tiger wins the 2008 Buick Invitational by eight strokes, marking his sixth win at the event and his 62nd PGA Tour win.

On June 16, Tiger wins the 2008 U.S. Open at Torrey Pines Golf course in San Diego, California. Parring the 91st hole in a sudden death match against Roco Mediate, Tiger claimed his third win at the event.

Days after winning the U.S. Open, Woods announces that needs to have reconstructive anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery on his left knee. He takes the remainder of the season off after the procedure.
2009
Eight months after undergoing knee surgery, Tiger returns to the tour in February, playing in the WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship.

In August, Tiger wins his 70thd PGA Tour win, prevailing by four strokes over Padraig Harrington and Robert Allenby at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational.

Tiger was in a one-car accident in the early hours of November 27. He hit a fire hydrant and a tree while backing out of his driveway in Orlando, Florida. Initially listed in "serious condition," Woods was released from the hospital with facial cuts. Many media outlets reported that the accident occurred after Woods and his wife, Elin Nordegren, had an argument. A series of women came forward following the accident, claiming to have had romantic relationships with Woods. In December, Woods acknowledged that he had been unfaithful to his wife and announced he was taking an "indefinite break from professional golf" to "to focus my attention on being a better husband, father, and person."

2010
Tiger returns to golf in April with a fourth place finish at the Masters. He also places fourth in the U.S. Open.

His divorce from Elin Nordegren Woods is finalized in August.
2011
Tiger ends the year ranked 50th in the world.
2012
Tiger wins the Arnold Palmer Invitational—his first PGA Tour victory since 2009 and continues his winning streak at the AT&T National.
2013
Tiger confirms he is dating professional skier Lindsey Vonn, 28.

Tiger wins five tournaments on his way to being named PGA Tour Player of the Year for the 11th time.

2014
A back injury derails Tiger's golf game; he has back surgery in March.
2015
With his back still troubling him, Tiger takes a break to ready himself for the Masters, where he finishes in the top 20.
MORE INFOS ::

Profile
Full name: Eldrick Tiger Woods
Best Known As: Dominating pro golfer and Nike celebrity.
Occupation: Professional Golfer
Date of Birth: December 30, 1975
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Biography
Born Eldrick Woods on December 30, 1975, in Cypress, California. As soon as he could stand up on his own, Tiger�s parents introduced their only child to the game of golf by giving him a sawed-off putter to practice with. He picked the game up fast and was shooting in the high 40's for nine holes before his third birthday. At the age of 8, he won the first of six Optimist International Junior World Titles. He is the
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Awards
Tiger Woods has had a remarkable career since becoming a professional golfer in the late summer of 1996. He has won more than 22 tournaments, 16 of those on the PGA tour, including the 1999 PGA Championship and the 1997 Masters Tournament. Woods was the youngest player ever to win the Masters. He has won numerous ...Read More

Facts  / Trivias
Woods collected his first strokeplay title of a difficult year when he stormed to an 8-shot victory at the Dunlop Phoenix tournament. His triumph signalled a welcome return to form, after his 5 years ...Read More

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